EDI Turkey event Feb 2015

VIDEO: War in Syria and Iraq: Effect on the Kurdish Issue in Turkey

On Thursday, December 26, 2015, the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) organized a panel discussion at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, titled “War in Syria and Iraq: Effect on the Kurdish Issue in Turkey”.

The panelists were:

Doga Ulas Eralp
Professorial Lecturer, American University

Mehmet Yuksel
HDP, Washington, DC Representative

Mutlu Civiroglu
Kurdish Affairs Analyst

Nora Fisher Onar
Fellow, Transatlantic Academy of the German Marshall Fund

The discussion was moderated by Reuf Bajrovic, the president of Emerging Democracies Institute.

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UPCOMING EVENT: War in Syria and Iraq: Effect on the Kurdish Issue in Turkey

Emerging Democracies Institute

cordially invites you to a panel discussion: 

War in Syria and Iraq: Effect on the Kurdish Issue in Turkey

Featuring

Doga Ulas Eralp

Professorial Lecturer, American University

Mehmet Yuksel

HDP, Washington, DC Representative

Mutlu Civiroglu

Kurdish Affairs Analyst

Nora Fisher Onar

 Fellow, Transatlantic Academy of the German Marshall Fund

Moderated by

Reuf Bajrovic

President, Emerging Democracies Institute

 

February 26, 2015

2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Choate Room

Eventbrite - War in Syria and Iraq: Effect on the Kurdish Issue in Turkey

Conflict in Syria and Iraq has entered a new phase after the latest escalation of violence by the Assad regime and ISIS.  More than 200.000 have been killed in Syria and hundreds die in Iraq every month since the emergence of ISIS last year. Turkey remains a critical actor for the future of the Kurdish political entities in Iraq and Syria as both countries have sizeable Kurdish populations on parts of territory bordering Turkey.  The successful defense of the town of Kobane in Northern Syria by joint Kurdish forces against the invading ISIS has once again underlined the importance of Kurds as credible actors in the new Middle East. Turkey on the other hand has acted quiet reluctantly in delivery of military and humanitarian support to the fighting Kurdish forces.  Public protests against Ankara’s passivity shook the towns in Eastern Turkey and forced the Davutoglu Government to allow for the Peshmerga to cross over to Kobane. The on-going secret negotiations between the PKK and Ankara are at a critical junction as they are about to go official. Possible peace deal between Ankara and the PKK could be a big step forward in consolidating democracy in Turkey.

The participants will discuss the impact of the wars in Syria and Iraq on the Kurdish peace talks in Turkey along with Turkey’s changing calculations in the Middle East.

Mehmet Yuksel is the current representative of the Peoples’ Democracy Party (HDP) in the USA. For the last 16 years, he has been active in the movement for democracy and human rights in Europe. In Copenhagen, he was a founder and active member of the Kurdish Youth Association. He later lived and worked in Rome, Brussels, and London. His activities have specially focused on the Kurdish issue. He speaks Kurdish, Turkish, Danish, Italian, English and German, and has studies informatics and specialized in peace-building and conflict resolution.

Mutlu Civiroglu is a Washington, DC-based journalist and a Kurdish affairs analyst focusing on Syria and Turkey. He has closely been monitoring the Kurdish People’s Protection Union (YPG)’s fight against ISIS and other Jihadist groups. His publications appear in various media outlets in including the BBC, CNN, Vice and Al-Jazeera. He regularly writes for the Turkish daily Radikal on recent developments in Rojava region in Syria.  Civiroglu is frequently interviewed by TV channels in Turkey, Iraqi Kurdistan and others on US, Turkey and Syria.

Nora Fisher Onar is a fellow at the Transatlantic Academy in Washington and Research Associate of the Centre for International Studies at the University of Oxford. She taught International Relations at Bahçeşehir University in Istanbul and has published numerous articles and book chapters in academic and policy fora. As an inaugural Ronald D. Asmus Policy Entrepreneurs Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, Fisher Onar wrote “From Model to Bystander and How to Bounce Back: Turkey, the Middle East, and the Transatlantic Alliance.” She received her doctorate in International Relations from the University of Oxford and holds masters and undergraduate degrees from Johns Hopkins SAIS and Georgetown University.

Ulas Doga Eralp works as a professorial lecturer at the International Peace and Conflict Resolution Program at American University’s School of International Service (SIS). He received his Ph.D. from the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University. Eralp has published widely on issues around democratization, international human rights, and conflict transformation in Western Balkans, Middle East, and Turkey. Eralp’s new edited volume “ Turkey as a Mediator: Stories of Success and Failure” will be published in spring of 2015 by Lexington. Eralp also consulted with organizations like the World Bank, National Endowment for Democracy among others as an evaluation specialist on democracy and dialogue programs. Eralp has a weekly column at Turkish Daily Taraf where he writes on the recent political developments in Turkey and in the US.

 

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VIDEO: Human Rights Challenges in Post-Election Bosnia and Herzegovina

On Monday, December 15, 2014, the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) and the Advisory Council for Bosnia and Herzegovina (ACBH) co-sponsored a panel discussion in Washington, DC, titled: Human Rights Challenges in Post-Election Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The panelists were:

Amb. Jonathan Moore
Head of the OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina

Tanya L. Domi
Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University

Jasmin Mujanovic
Visiting Scholar at Columbia University Harriman Institute

The discussion was moderated by Reuf Bajrovic, the president of EDI.

 

Bosnia and Herzegovina’s seventh general election since the 1995 signing of the Dayton Peace Accords, held on October 12th, produced some nominal changes in the political landscape. With the government formation process still underway, unresolved human rights issues have been largely sidelined; however, they are bound to play a role during the next government’s mandate. The new British-German initiative to facilitate the country’s EU integration has effectively postponed the implementation of the European Court of Human Right’s Sejdic-Finci decision for a later stage in the accession process, but the verdict will continue to be on the Council of Europe’s agenda. Furthermore, several dozen ethnically divided schools – the so-called ‘two schools under one roof’ – continue to operate throughout the country. The new government’s responsibility to uphold human rights standards is only set to become more pertinent with the additional rulings by the European Court of Human Rights.

The panelists will discuss human rights challenges for the next government and the country’s EU and NATO accession process.

Amb. Jonathan Moore began his assignment as OSCE Chief of Mission to Bosnia in Herzegovina in September 2014. Previously, he served as the Director of the Office of South Central European Affairs. That office has lead policy responsibilities for Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia. Mr. Moore, a career member of the Senior Foreign Service, joined the State Department in 1990 and was assigned to the Embassy in Belgrade in 1991. He was a desk officer for the former Yugoslavia from 1993 to 1995, and was the Embassy’s Political/Economic Section Chief in Lithuania from 1995 to 1999. After a one-year assignment as a Congressional Fellow in the Policy Office of Speaker of the House Hastert, Mr. Moore was the Deputy Director of the State Department’s Office of Russian Affairs from 2000 until 2002, serving as Acting Director for several months in early 2002. He then worked as Deputy Chief of Mission in Namibia from 2002 to 2005. Mr. Moore was a 2005-06 National Security Affairs Fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. He was Deputy Chief of Mission in Belarus from 2006 until 2008, and was Chargé there from 2008 until 2009. Before returning to Washington, he was Deputy Chief of Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina from 2009 to 2012. Mr. Moore has received a Distinguished Honor Award and several Superior and Meritorious Honor Awards, two awards for language proficiency from the American Foreign Service Association, and the Lithuanian Orders of Merit and Grand Duke Gediminas. He speaks Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Lithuanian, Russian, German, and Danish.

 

Tanya L. Domi is an Adjunct Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and is an affiliate faculty member of the Harriman Institute. Domi teaches human rights in the Western Balkans. She has earned a Masters of Arts degree in Human Rights from Columbia University. Prior to her appointment at Columbia, Domi worked internationally for more than a decade on issues related to democratic transitional development, including political and media development, human rights, gender issues and human trafficking. During her previous work in Bosnia and Herzegovina implementing the Dayton Peace Accords for the OSCE Mission 1996-2000, she served in the position of Spokesperson, Counselor to U.S. Ambassador Robert Barry and Chair of the OSCE Media Experts Commission.  She has worked in Albania, Armenia, Georgia, Haiti, Kosovo, Montenegro, Nepal, Serbia, The Gambia, The Philippines and South Sudan. Domi served 15 years in the U.S. Army as an enlisted soldier and commissioned officer and later became defense policy analyst to the late Congressman Frank McCloskey (D-IN). Domi is a widely published writer and commentator. She has appeared in The New York TimesThe Christian Science MonitorAl Jazeera AmericaThe Washington Post, The BBC, Oslobodjenje and La Noveliste, and has been interviewed by National Public Radio, CSPAN, CNN International and PBS Newshour. She is currently writing a book on the emerging LGBT human rights movement in the Western Balkans.

 

Jasmin Mujanović is a PhD candidate in Political Science at York University in Toronto and currently a Visiting Scholar at the Harriman Institute at Columbia University in New York City. His academic work is concentrated on questions of democratic consolidation and the development of the state, with a particular focus on Bosnia-Herzegovina. A frequent Balkan affairs analyst, at the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) he serves as the Social Media Director, writing for and maintaining the EDI blog, as well as the Institute’s Twitter and Facebook accounts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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VIDEO: Islam in Bosnia and Herzegovina: A Model for Emerging Democracies?

On Monday, October 27, 2014, the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) and the Advisory Council for Bosnia and Herzegovina (ACBH) co-sponsored a lecture in Washington, DC titled: “Islam in Bosnia and Herzegovina: A Model for Emerging Democracies?”

A distinguished University of Sarajevo professor, Dr. Dino Abazovic. offered his expertise on this topic.

The event was moderated by Ajla Delkic, Executive Director of the Advisory Council for Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The entire video of the lecture is available below:

Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Islamic heritage has been evolving for over five centuries. The phenomenon of Bosnian Muslims as heirs of specific religious and cultural tradition – often called “autochthonous European Muslims”– has not been sufficiently studied and researched. At the same time, different interpretations of issues linked to Bosnian Muslims are multiplying on agendas of various interests groups, from experts in the field, to nongovernmental actors, other religious communities, domestic decisions makers, and political centers of powers within European and overseas capitals. This lecture will review some of the crucial processes unfolding within past two decades among Bosnian Muslims and whether they can serve as a model for the emerging democracies of the MENA region.

Dino Abazović is an associate professor of Sociology at the University of Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. He has also worked as the Director of the Human Rights Center of the University of Sarajevo and as the Academic Coordinator of the Religious Studies Program of the Center for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Studies at University of Sarajevo. He has published a number of chapters and papers in English and the South-Slavic languages, including three books in Bosnian (“Bosnian Muslims Between Secularisation and Desecularisation”, 2012; “Religion in Transition: Essays on Religion and Politics”, 2010, “For God and Nation: Sociological approach to Religious Nationalism”, 2006). He has also co-authored a book with Jelena Radojković and Milan Vukomanović (Religions of the World: Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, 2007), and edited five books (with Mitja Velikonja, Post-Yugoslavia: New Cultural and Political Perspectives, 2014; with Stefan Hammer, Bosnia and Herzegovina Fifteen Years after Dayton: Political and Legal Aspects of Democratic Consolidation in Post-Conflict Period, 2011; with Zilka Spahić – Šiljak, Monotheistic Trialogue: Introduction in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, 2009; with Ivan Cvitković, Religion and European Integrations, 2006; and with Branko Todorović, Confronting with the Past – Consequences for the Future, 2005). In 2012 Abazović was awarded a research fellowship at the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIAS). He is a non-resident fellow at the Emerging Democracies Institute in Washington, DC. He lives and works in Sarajevo.

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EVENT: 2014 General Election and Future Reforms in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The Emerging Democracies Institute

cordially invites you to a panel discussion: 

                                   

2014 General Election and Future Reforms in Bosnia and Herzegovina

featuring

 Amb. Jonathan Moore

Head of Mission, OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina

Mary Ann Hennessey

Head of Council of Europe Office in Bosnia and Herzegovina

 Michael Haltzel

Senior Fellow, School of Advanced International Studies, Washington DC

 

moderated by

 

Reuf Bajrovic

President, Emerging Democracies Institute

     

Friday, October 10, 2014

4:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Location:

Hotel Europe Atrium, Vladislava Skarica 5, Sarajevo

Bosnia and Herzegovina is in its deepest political crisis since the Dayton Peace Accords was signed in 1995. Peace and stability have endured for almost two decades in great part due to the stabilizing role of the United States, European Union, OSCE, Council of Europe as well as other international actors. However, as the recent violent protests have shown, the citizens are very dissatisfied with the current situation in the country. The country has not made any progress towards NATO and EU membership since the last election in 2010 and questions hang over its integration prospects in the 2014-2018 period. Also, Bosnia and Herzegovina is still in violation of the European Convention on Human Rights because of the unwillingness of the political elite to implement the Sejdic-Finci ruling.

The panelists will provide their views on the 2014 election campaign as well as the country’s reform prospects.

Note: the event will be in English. 

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BRIEFING: Bosnia and Herzegovina 19 Years After Dayton: The Crimea Spillover and U.S. Role in Overcoming Challenges to Stability

On Tuesday, May 13, 2014, the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) and the Advisory Council for Bosnia and Herzegovina (ACBH) co-sponsored a briefing at the United States Congress in Washington D.C. titled ‘Bosnia and Herzegovina 19 Years After Dayton: The Crimea Spillover and U.S. Role in Overcoming Challenges to Stability’

The speakers were:

Amb. Valentin Inzko
High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina

Reuf Bajrovic
President, Emerging Democracies Institute

The briefing was chaired by Ajla Delkic, Executive Director of ACBH.

The 1992-1995 war in Bosnia and Herzegovina left more than 100,000 people dead and over 2 million of the country’s pre-war population displaced. Nineteen years after the signing of the Dayton Peace Accords (DPA), which stopped the war, grave violations of the peace agreement continue to pose a challenge to peace and stability. Three weeks ago, the leadership of Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina’s smaller entity violated the DPA and adopted its own decision on residency. If carried out, it would take away the voting rights of millions of displaced persons, including nearly all Bosnian Americans. Furthermore, inspired by events in Crimea, Republika Srpska once again threatened a referendum on secession while fully supporting Russian President, Vladimir Putin’s action in Ukraine. To avoid a spillover effect, the countries of Southeast Europe require a steadfast commitment of the international community led by the United States. The recent backsliding in the implementation of the DPA, especially its provisions guaranteeing a sustainable return of refugees and the displaced persons, is a great cause of concern for the future stability and prosperity of a multiethnic state of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Yet, there is reason for hope as the nationwide civic coalition called “March 1st” seeks to mobilize hundreds of thousands of displaced Bosnians and Herzegovinians living in the United States and around the globe to reverse the effects of ethnic cleansing and genocide, contribute to a better implementation of the DPA, and more actively contribute to a better future for Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The entire video of the briefing is now available

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EVENT: The Future of Kosovo’s Statehood and Its European Integration Perspective

On Wednesday, April 30, 2014, the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) organized organized a panel discussion at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, titled “The Future of Kosovo’s Statehood and Its European Integration Perspective”.

The panelists were:

Albin Kurti
President, Lëvizja Vetëvendosje! (Movement for Self-Determination)

Shpend Ahmeti
Mayor of Prishtina

The discussion was moderated by Reuf Bajrovic, the president of EDI.

The entire video of the event is available here:

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UPCOMING EVENT: The Future of Kosovo’s Statehood and Its European Integration Perspective

The Emerging Democracies Institute

cordially invites you to a panel discussion:

“The Future of Kosovo’s Statehood and Its European Integration Perspective”

Featuring

Albin Kurti
President, Lëvizja Vetëvendosje! (Movement for Self-Determination)

Shpend Ahmeti
Mayor of Prishtina

moderated by

Reuf Bajrovic
President, Emerging Democracies Institute

Wednesday, April 30, 2014
10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Carnegie Endowment For International Peace, Root Room
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington DC 20036

Eventbrite - The Future of Kosovo's Statehood and its European Integration Persepctive

Despite the breakthrough agreement between Prime Ministers of the Republic of Serbia and the Republic of Kosovo, brokered by the European Union in Brussels in April 2013, Kosovo’s international status remains largely unchanged. While refusing to recognize Kosovo as a sovereign state, Serbia is blocking its entry into the United Nations with full backing of the Russian Federation.

This panel will discuss the impact of the Brussels Agreement on Kosovo’s integration into the European Union, as well as analyze Kosovo’s upcoming parliamentary election and how its outcome may affect regional relations.

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EVENT: General Elections 2014 and the Protests in Bosnia: Is Change Possible?

On Wednesday, April 2, 2014, the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) and the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) organized a public discussion with experts examining whether the ongoing protests in Bosnia and Herzegovina cause concern for the upcoming elections.

The panelists included:

Reuf Bajrovic, President, Emerging Democracies Institute

Milada Vachudova, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Darko Brkan, President, Zasto ne

The discussion was moderated by Renata Stuebner,
Senior Program Specialist, U.S. Institute of Peace

Video of the entire discussion is available here:

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EVENT: Local Elections in Turkey and the Future Direction of Turkish Democracy

On Tuesday, April 1, 2014, the Emerging Democracies Institute (EDI) organized organized a panel discussion at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, titled Local Elections in Turkey and the Future Direction of Turkish Democracy.

The panelists were:

Dr. Fevzi Bilgin, Executive Director, Rethink Institute

Cenk Sidar, CEO, Sidar Global Advisors (SGA)

Prof. Soner Cagaptay, Director of the Turkish Research Program at The Washington Institute

The discussion was moderated by Dr. Ulas Doga Eralp from the

School of International Service,  American University.

The video of the entire event is available here: